Roster  Schedule  Statistics 

Coaches

Print
RSS
Alan Lowry
Special Teams

Biography

Alan Lowry is in his 17th season as an assistant coach with the Titans and 14th as special teams coach. During the last 12 seasons, the Titans have produced 18 special teams touchdowns, including 14 kick returns for touchdowns. Lowry’s special teams have consistently ranked among the league leaders in both return yardage and return defense while placing a number of different players among the league leaders in return yardage, including Derrick Mason, Pacman Jones, Chris Carr and Marc Mariani.

Last year, kicker Rob Bironas had one of the finest seasons of his career as he hit 29 of 32 field goals (90.6%) and he will carry two streaks into the 2012 season. He has made his last 15 consecutive field goals and has 10 consecutive games that he has made at least one 40-plus yard field goal, which is an NFL record. Additionally, punter Brett Kern set a new franchise mark for net punting average (39.4). As a special teams group, the Titans finished fourth among all categories in Rick Gosselin’s (Dallas Morning News) Special Teams Rankings.

As a rookie in 2010, Mariani earned Pro Bowl honors by leading the NFL and setting a franchise record for combined return yardage (1,859). He recorded both a kickoff return for touchdown and punt return for touchdown. As a special teams unit, the Titans finished second among all categories in Gosselin’s (Dallas Morning News) Special Teams Rankings. Bironas scored 110 points and was nearly perfect for the season, going 24-26 on field goal tries and matching the best percentage in franchise history.

In 2009, Lowry was dealt a difficult hand when veteran punter Craig Hentrich was lost for the season in the second game. Eventually, Kern was claimed off waivers from Denver and put together a sensational 10 games with the Titans – averaging 45.0 yards per punt and a net average of 41.4 yards. A whopping 48 percent of Kern’s punts (18 of 37) were placed inside the opponent’s 20.

In 2008, the Titans finished first in the NFL in kickoff return average (25.4) and Carr finished in the top 10 in the AFC in both kickoff return average and punt return average.

In 2007, Lowry aided in the emergence of Bironas into a record-setting performer and a Pro Bowl talent. Bironas earned his first Pro Bowl selection after leading the league in field goals made (35), including an NFL record eight field goals in a game at Houston.

The special teams unit had another standout season in 2006, which included the leading punt returner in the NFL (Pacman Jones, 12.9 avg.), ranking second in net punt average, third in punts inside the 20-yard line (32) and a franchise long 60-yard field goal by Bironas to defeat Indianapolis. The last time a Titans/Oilers player led the league in punt return average was 1977, when Billy “White Shoes” Johnson held the distinction. Jones also matched Johnson’s 1975 franchise record of three punt returns for touchdowns in one season.

In 2005, the Titans were the only NFL team that didn’t have a negative special teams play over the entire season (fumble lost, blocked kick, return allowed for touchdown).

In 2004, the Titans finished fourth in the NFL in net punt average (37.8) and in 2003, led the NFL in kickoff return average defense, allowing only 18.8 yards per return. In 2002, the Titans led the league in average starting position after kickoff. In the 2002 season finale at Houston (12/29/02), the Titans blocked a field goal and a punt for the first time in the same game since 1991. 

In 2000, the Titans were one of only two NFL teams (Seattle) to rank in the top 10 in the league in punt return average, kickoff return average, punt return defense and kickoff return defense.

In the 1999 season, the Titans were propelled to the Super Bowl with a number of plays on special teams, including the "Music City Miracle" and Mason's 80-yard kick return for a touchdown in the 1999 AFC Championship Game. Lowry took over the Titans' special teams after coaching the club's wide receivers corps from 1997-98. He has 10 seasons of experience coaching special teams from his positions with Dallas (1982-85, ‘89), Tampa Bay (1991) and San Francisco (1992-95). Lowry joined the Oilers in 1996 as defensive assistant/quality control coach and was promoted to wide receivers coach one year later.

Lowry spent nine seasons with the Dallas Cowboys (1982-90). He originally joined the Cowboys in 1982 and through the years filled many roles, including coaching special teams (1982-85, ’89), receivers (1986-88) and tight ends (1990). In 1991, he served as the special teams/tight ends coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and as special teams coach for the San Francisco 49ers from 1992-95. In San Francisco, Lowry and the Niners made three NFC Championship game appearances (1992, 1993, 1994) and captured a Super Bowl Championship (XXIX).

A former quarterback and defensive back at the University of Texas, Lowry earned All-Southwest Conference honors before joining the coaching ranks. Lowry began his coaching career at Virginia Tech in 1974 before moving to the University of Wyoming in 1975. He spent 1976 with the Dallas Cowboys in their scouting department before returning to Texas from 1977-81 as defensive backs coach.

A native of Miami, Okla., Lowry resides in Franklin, Tenn., with his wife, Donna. The couple has two grown daughters, Marta and Lindsay.

Alan Lowry Coaching Ledger:

1999-12: Special Teams, Tennessee Titans
1997-98: Wide Receivers, Tennessee Oilers
1996: Defensive Assistant/Quality Control, Houston Oilers
1992-95: Special Teams, San Francisco 49ers
1991: Special Teams/Tight Ends, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1990: Tight Ends, Dallas Cowboys
1989: Special Teams, Dallas Cowboys
1986-88: Receivers, Dallas Cowboys
1982-85: Special Teams, Dallas Cowboys
1977-81: Defensive Backs, University of Texas
1975: Defensive Backs, University of Wyoming
1974: Quarterbacks, Virginia Polytechnic Institute

 

Alan Lowry is in his 17th season as an assistant coach with the Titans and 14th as special teams coach. During the last 12 seasons, the Titans have produced 18 special teams touchdowns, including 14 kick returns for touchdowns. Lowry’s special teams have consistently ranked among the league leaders in both return yardage and return defense while placing a number of different players among the league leaders in return yardage, including Derrick Mason, Pacman Jones, Chris Carr and Marc Mariani.

Last year, kicker Rob Bironas had one of the finest seasons of his career as he hit 29 of 32 field goals (90.6%) and he will carry two streaks into the 2012 season. He has made his last 15 consecutive field goals and has 10 consecutive games that he has made at least one 40-plus yard field goal, which is an NFL record. Additionally, punter Brett Kern set a new franchise mark for net punting average (39.4). As a special teams group, the Titans finished fourth among all categories in Rick Gosselin’s (Dallas Morning News) Special Teams Rankings.

As a rookie in 2010, Mariani earned Pro Bowl honors by leading the NFL and setting a franchise record for combined return yardage (1,859). He recorded both a kickoff return for touchdown and punt return for touchdown. As a special teams unit, the Titans finished second among all categories in Gosselin’s (Dallas Morning News) Special Teams Rankings. Bironas scored 110 points and was nearly perfect for the season, going 24-26 on field goal tries and matching the best percentage in franchise history.

In 2009, Lowry was dealt a difficult hand when veteran punter Craig Hentrich was lost for the season in the second game. Eventually, Kern was claimed off waivers from Denver and put together a sensational 10 games with the Titans – averaging 45.0 yards per punt and a net average of 41.4 yards. A whopping 48 percent of Kern’s punts (18 of 37) were placed inside the opponent’s 20.

In 2008, the Titans finished first in the NFL in kickoff return average (25.4) and Carr finished in the top 10 in the AFC in both kickoff return average and punt return average.

In 2007, Lowry aided in the emergence of Bironas into a record-setting performer and a Pro Bowl talent. Bironas earned his first Pro Bowl selection after leading the league in field goals made (35), including an NFL record eight field goals in a game at Houston.

The special teams unit had another standout season in 2006, which included the leading punt returner in the NFL (Pacman Jones, 12.9 avg.), ranking second in net punt average, third in punts inside the 20-yard line (32) and a franchise long 60-yard field goal by Bironas to defeat Indianapolis. The last time a Titans/Oilers player led the league in punt return average was 1977, when Billy “White Shoes” Johnson held the distinction. Jones also matched Johnson’s 1975 franchise record of three punt returns for touchdowns in one season.

In 2005, the Titans were the only NFL team that didn’t have a negative special teams play over the entire season (fumble lost, blocked kick, return allowed for touchdown).

In 2004, the Titans finished fourth in the NFL in net punt average (37.8) and in 2003, led the NFL in kickoff return average defense, allowing only 18.8 yards per return. In 2002, the Titans led the league in average starting position after kickoff. In the 2002 season finale at Houston (12/29/02), the Titans blocked a field goal and a punt for the first time in the same game since 1991. 

In 2000, the Titans were one of only two NFL teams (Seattle) to rank in the top 10 in the league in punt return average, kickoff return average, punt return defense and kickoff return defense.

In the 1999 season, the Titans were propelled to the Super Bowl with a number of plays on special teams, including the "Music City Miracle" and Mason's 80-yard kick return for a touchdown in the 1999 AFC Championship Game. Lowry took over the Titans' special teams after coaching the club's wide receivers corps from 1997-98. He has 10 seasons of experience coaching special teams from his positions with Dallas (1982-85, ‘89), Tampa Bay (1991) and San Francisco (1992-95). Lowry joined the Oilers in 1996 as defensive assistant/quality control coach and was promoted to wide receivers coach one year later.

Lowry spent nine seasons with the Dallas Cowboys (1982-90). He originally joined the Cowboys in 1982 and through the years filled many roles, including coaching special teams (1982-85, ’89), receivers (1986-88) and tight ends (1990). In 1991, he served as the special teams/tight ends coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and as special teams coach for the San Francisco 49ers from 1992-95. In San Francisco, Lowry and the Niners made three NFC Championship game appearances (1992, 1993, 1994) and captured a Super Bowl Championship (XXIX).

A former quarterback and defensive back at the University of Texas, Lowry earned All-Southwest Conference honors before joining the coaching ranks. Lowry began his coaching career at Virginia Tech in 1974 before moving to the University of Wyoming in 1975. He spent 1976 with the Dallas Cowboys in their scouting department before returning to Texas from 1977-81 as defensive backs coach.

A native of Miami, Okla., Lowry resides in Franklin, Tenn., with his wife, Donna. The couple has two grown daughters, Marta and Lindsay.

Alan Lowry Coaching Ledger:

1999-12: Special Teams, Tennessee Titans
1997-98: Wide Receivers, Tennessee Oilers
1996: Defensive Assistant/Quality Control, Houston Oilers
1992-95: Special Teams, San Francisco 49ers
1991: Special Teams/Tight Ends, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1990: Tight Ends, Dallas Cowboys
1989: Special Teams, Dallas Cowboys
1986-88: Receivers, Dallas Cowboys
1982-85: Special Teams, Dallas Cowboys
1977-81: Defensive Backs, University of Texas
1975: Defensive Backs, University of Wyoming
1974: Quarterbacks, Virginia Polytechnic Institute

 

 

Recent Articles

Recent Videos